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Sunday, 13 November 2016 08:45

Managing a Student Project with Enterprise Architect – Part 2

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Read Part 1 of this Case Study

We’re attempting a “crowdsourced bad driver reporting system” this semester, and because we need to be really productive, we’re using Enterprise Architect to model the project, field-test the Resilient Agile process, and to coordinate all of the student homework.  Students communicate with each other and with me using a shared EA model.

This semester I’m working with a group of 15 Masters students and an aggregate effective time budget of 80 student hours per week.  We’ve got about 12 usable weeks of student time, so it works out to a time budget of roughly 1000 student hours (that’s about half-a-person-year at 40 hours a week) over a 3 month schedule.

Resilient Agile is a flexible process in that it can be employed with traditional Scrum/Kanban sprints and backlogs, or alternatively we can leverage parallelism, and each student can be assigned a use case and develop their use case independently. 

I’ve been a big fan of leveraging parallelism in software development since I was a programmer at NASA/JPL way back in the 80s when I rescued a late project using a “divide-and-conquer” coding strategy, so we’re trying to see how far we can push the limits on massively parallel development with student projects at USC.  Communication and well-defined interfaces are key when team members are working in parallel, so the shared EA model is critically important.

Parallel modeling and development has also been a theme of our ICONIX JumpStart classes for the last 20 years, where we go into industry and work a client’s real project by splitting the class up into “lab teams”.  Typically in ICONIX JumpStart classes we put 3 or 4 students on a package of use cases, whereas on this project each student got a single use case.

If you’re going to leverage parallelism in development you have to do things a little bit differently.  Here’s an overview of the process we’re following:

1.     Plan for Parallelism (identify dependencies and architect for parallelism)

2.     Build the Right System (discover requirements, prototype areas of technical risk, and agree on conceptual designs)

3.     Build the System Right (carefully review detailed designs)

4.     Integrate as often as necessary

Enterprise Architect is a key enabler of the above process.   I would never attempt this approach without a good solid modeling tool at the heart of it. This article will show how we’ve used EA to accomplish the 4 steps above. 

 Read Part 3 of this Case Study

Read 2066 times Last modified on Sunday, 04 December 2016 23:56
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doug rosenberg

doug rosenberg

ICONIX (Chief Executive Officer)
 
Doug Rosenberg founded ICONIX in his living room in 1984 and began training companies in object-oriented analysis and design around 1990. ICONIX specializes in JumpStart training for UML and SysML, and offers both onsite and open-enrollment courses.
 
Doug developed a Unified Booch/Rumbaugh/Jacobson approach to modeling in 1993, several years before the advent of UML, and began writing books around 1995. Design Driven Testing is his 6th book on software engineering. He’s also authored numerous multimedia tutorials (including Enterprise Architect for Power Users) and several eBooks, including Embedded Systems Development with SysML.
 
Doug has spent the last few years doing "deep dive" consulting into cutting-edge technology including cross-platform mobile app development, REST APIs, and NoSQL databases, and gaining first-hand experience on some "hardcore agile" projects of varying sizes.  He's also been working with dozens of graduate students at the University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering (USC CSSE), managing Directed Research projects and developing/piloting the Resilient Agile process. 

Website: www.iconixsw.com/
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