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Friday, 22 March 2013 22:15

Four Principles of Agile Triage

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There’s an epidemic of bad software floating around these days.  Chances are you’ve encountered buggy and/or unnecessarily hard to use software recently. 

This epidemic isn’t really surprising, especially if you’ve read the books I’ve written with Matt Stephens: Design Driven Testing or Extreme Programming Refactored or Agile Development with ICONIX Process.  There’s a bunch of agile development shops out there underspecifying their software and (as a result) testing it inadequately, so that you and I can have the privilege of debugging it for them and putting new user stories onto their backlog.

Imagine for a moment that you’re working at a company where the agile development process has gone off the rails and there is a train wreck. There’s a lot of smoke from the burndown charts burning up.  Bodies are strewn all around, there are broken bones and people are bleeding everywhere. Some parts of your code are savable, and some have to be thrown away. You need to triage the situation and do damage control.  Here are some guiding principles for your triage effort:

1.     You can’t unit test what you forgot to remember.

2.     You can't do scenario testing without modeling scenarios

3.     You can't do requirement testing without modeling requirements

4.     Excessive timeboxing results in shoddy workmanship

Read 4444 times Last modified on Tuesday, 09 April 2013 05:12
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doug rosenberg

doug rosenberg

ICONIX (Chief Executive Officer)
 
Doug Rosenberg founded ICONIX in his living room in 1984 and began training companies in object-oriented analysis and design around 1990. ICONIX specializes in JumpStart training for UML and SysML, and offers both onsite and open-enrollment courses.
 
Doug developed a Unified Booch/Rumbaugh/Jacobson approach to modeling in 1993, several years before the advent of UML, and began writing books around 1995. Design Driven Testing is his 6th book on software engineering. He’s also authored numerous multimedia tutorials (including Enterprise Architect for Power Users) and several eBooks, including Embedded Systems Development with SysML.
 
Doug has spent the last few years doing "deep dive" consulting into cutting-edge technology including cross-platform mobile app development, REST APIs, and NoSQL databases, and gaining first-hand experience on some "hardcore agile" projects of varying sizes.  He's also been working with dozens of graduate students at the University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering (USC CSSE), managing Directed Research projects and developing/piloting the Resilient Agile process. 

Website: www.iconixsw.com/
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