Enterprise Architect version 13.5

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eaDocX's eaXL module makes it possible to import and export information between Excel and Sparx Enterprise Architect, e.g. requirements, classes (including attributes or methods), use cases, etc.

This article provides a feedback on a real-life experience where eaXL has been used for a request for proposal (RFP): more than a hundred requirements have been imported into Enterprise Architect in order to carry the analysis and build the response with the aid and support of the model-driven approach. Steps involved to import the customer's requirements are covered in this article.

Note: eaXL module for Excel support requires eaDocX Corporate edition.

Context

I recently worked on an RFP that included more than a hundred requirements organised by categories. Details of each requirement (description, reference, category) were provided in an Excel file that had to be completed and returned with our response and proposals. Being given the task to analyse each requirement and assess the feasibility and complexity, I chose to build the response and capture all the elements within an Enterprise Architect modelling project.

A response to an RFP usually requires to work on a wide array of topics and queries. Model-driven can ease up this task by gathering and structuring all the elements created for this purpose. Collaborative access to the modelling project also enables several peers to share the tasks.

Once a new Enterprise Architect project had been set up, the client's requirements were imported via the following the process:

eadocx eaxl import client requirements in enterprise architect

Summary of the main steps from the above BPMN2 diagram:

  • Step A: prior to run an import from Excel with eaDocX's eaXL, an Excel file needs to be generated. To do so, eaXL export must be run with at least a single blank requirement from Enterprise Architect. This first step involves creating a couple of blank requirements in the model.
  • Step B: run an eaXL export of the blank requirements from Enterprise Architect into a generated Excel file.
  • Step C: populate the Excel file with the requirements provided by the client.
  • Step D: import the client's requirements from Excel to Enterprise Architect using eaXL.

Step A: create blank requirements in the Enterprise Architect model

A1. Once the Enterprise Architect project has been initialised, blank requirements are created in the requirements model (eaXL needs to have at least one requirement to export in order to generate an Excel file).

A2. Tagged values are added to the blank requirements so that additional information provided by the client can be entered in the Excel spreadsheet, e.g. Feasible (true/false), Priority, and Category

requirements model sparx enterprise architect

Step B: export the blank requirements from the Enteprise Architect project to Excel with eaXL

B1. In order to generate an Excel file that's compatible with eaXL, an export is run from the Enterprise Architect requirements model to Excel via a right click on the source package > Extensions > eaDocX > Open in Excel.

  • Result: blank requirements have been exported into a new Excel file.

B2. Additional properties are enabled via the eaXL columns tab: Name, Alias, Description, and the pre defined tagged values (Feasible, Priority, and Category).

export requirements eadocx eaxl

B3. The Excel content is updated by clicking on the button "Export data from EA to current worksheet".

  • Result: the Excel file has been updated with the additional properties.

export requirements eadocx eaxl Excel file output

Step C: populate the Excel eaXL template file with the client's requirements

C1. All the client's requirements must be copied from the original file to the eaXL generated Excel file, under a separate worksheet.

C2. In the current scenario, the available information is organised under the following Excel columns:

  • Excel column B - Ref (reference)
  • Excel column C - Category
  • Excel column D - Description (full requirement's text)
  • Excel column E - Title: some of the requirements contain a very long body description, hence their title has been set using an Excel function (STTX) to truncate the description to the first 200 characters

customer requirements data to import to enterprise architect from Excel

C3. Using references between cells, the first worksheet has been populated with details according to the eaXL columns (worksheet no 1 is used by eaXL import/export).

  • Excel column D - Name : formula = "=Feuil2!E2" (Title column from worksheet 2)
  • Excel column E - Alias : formula = "=Feuil2!B2" (Ref column from worksheet 2)
  • Excel column F - Description : formula = "=Feuil2!D2" (Description column from worksheet 2)
  • Excel column G - TV Category : formula = "=Feuil2!C2" (Category column from worksheet 2)
  • Excel column H - TV Priority : value = "M" (default value = Must)
  • Excel column I - TV Feasible : value = "1" (default value = true)
  • Excel column C - ElementType : value = "Requirement" (provides eaXL with the element type to import)

eadocx sparx customer requirements data to import to enterprise architect from Excel

Step D: import the client's requirements from Excel to the Enterprise Architect project with eaXL

D1. In Enterprise Architect eaDocX/eaXL is used to run a comparison with the model:

eadocx eaxl Sparx comparison Enterprise Architect Excel

D2. eaXL import from Excel to Enterprise Architect is run via the action "Import contents of worksheet into EA".

  • Result: requirements have been imported in the model with the title, description and tagged values for the feasibility, priority, and category.

eadocx eaxl Sparx imported requirements into Enterprise Architect from Excel

Tagged values from an imported requirement are illustrated below:

 eadocx eaxl Sparx imported requirements into Enterprise Architect from Exce tagged values

D3. At this stage, blank requirements created in step A are deleted.

D4. Using a custom VB script in Enterprise Architect, each requirement is moved into a sub package, named after the Category Tagged Value. This is intended to simplify the organisation of requirements within the model.

run enterprise architect script

  • Result: requirements are grouped by category in the project tree.

enterprise architect project browser requirements eaXL

Next steps: building the response and proposal, generate the Excel deliverable

Having all the RFP requirements in the modelling project, the analysis and elaboration of the answer can be carried out:

  • Creating "response" stereotyped requirements and Feature elements. Associate these elements to the client's requirements.
  • Creating UML/BPMN diagrams to suggest an architecture, illustrate the solution or an option to one or several requirements.
  • Assessing and updating the Feasibility tagged value for each requirement.
  • Exporting results to Excel with eaXL.
  • Generate the response and answser to the RFP in the Word forma using eaDocX.

Conclusion

Enterprise Architect made it possible to efficiently carry out the analysis of a long list of requirements by building up the models with the solution's elements, links between requirements of similar purpose, and realisation links between the RFP requirements and solution elements. Once the analysis had been completed, generating the Excel deliverable for the client only required a few minutes.

This Excel file was ready to be sent alongside a Word document generated with eaDocX, including a relationships matrix between requirements and system features to implement.

In case the RFP process has been successful, a model-driven approach provides the advantage of starting the project with an existing Enterprise Architect project.

The Excel import/export feature for Enterprise Architect available with eaDocX (eaXL module) can be used for many other purposes: importing requirements and use cases in the project, synchronise requirements with other tools via the Excel format, import business classes from Excel, etc.

Published in Case Studies
Tuesday, 16 April 2013 12:25

EA Document creation just got even better

We're pleased to announce the release of eaDocX v3.3, making it even easier to integrate your EA analyses directly into Word and Excel with no need for scripting.

New features include: 
- Support for Word and Excel 2013 
- Model Expert: a graphical tool to help you understand the structure of your EA model 
- Even better Quick documents to create a Word document of any package in your model in just 2 clicks 
- Phone home - to keep you up to date with latest releases 
- More configurable options for your documents 
- Define your own Word Table styles 
- and a whole load of other customer requests 

For more information and a free 30 day trial visit www.eadocx.com

 

Published in News
Saturday, 28 November 2009 07:24

Simple VBA Excel to EA importer version 4

ExcelImporterLogo

Version 4 on the Excel to EA Importer now introduces a feature to export Tagged Values to Excel, edit them in Excel and import the changes back into Enterprise Architect.

The Excel to EA importer is a rather simple tool to import stuff into EA. It has been available on the Sparx Community Site since 2009 and it has always been one of the most popular resources.

Version 2 was a small improvement allowing for different types of Elements.

Version 3 added the feature to import the glossary into EA.

Now in version 4 we have yet another tab Tagged Values that will be used to export and import tagged values.

TaggedValuesTab

 

Free download

Elements and Attributes

Columns A till F are used in the sheet ElementsAndAttributes . Fill in the the columns with your own data.

  • Type
    Fill in the type of the Element you wish to import. This column should contain either Attribute or one of the EA Element types as defined in the documentation of EA.Element.Type. An attribute will be added to the last specified Element.
  • Name
    The name of the element or attribute.
  • Stereotype
    The stereotype of the element or attribute. Use null to specify an empty stereotype.
  • Description
    The description of the element or attribute.
  • Attribute Type
    The type of the attributeThis column should not be used for Elements. Use null to specify an empty type.
  • Attribute Length
    This value will be added as a tagged value with the name length on the attribute.  Again this is only for attributes.

Glossary

In the 2nd sheet Glossary you can fill in columns A until C with:

  • Term
    The term name is mandatory.
  • Type
    The type of the term is mandatory as well
  • Meaning
    The meaning of the term is optional.

Tagged Values

The Tagged Values sheet can only be used to edit existing tagged values, not for importing new tagged values into EA. It contains the following columns

  • GUID
    The unique identifier of the tagged value. Used to find the tagged value in the model. – Do not change.
  • Type
    Used to indicate if the tagged value is on an element, attribute, operation or connector. – Do not change
  • Property
    The name of the tagged value. This field can be used to rename tagged values
  • Value
    The value of the tagged value. This field can be edited.
  • Notes
    The notes of the tagged value. This field can be edited.
  • Owner
    The name of the element that owns the tagged value. Used as a context indicator. Changing this field will have no effect.

Export/Import

Once all you data has been filled in you are ready to import the data into EA.

Excel Addin tab

  • Open the sheet you wish to import
  • If you are on the ElementsAndAttributes sheet press the button Import, or run the macro (Alt-F8) importFromExcel
  • If you are on the Glossary sheet press the button Import Glossary, or  run the macro (Alt-F8) importGlossaryFromExcel
  • On the Tagged Values  sheet you can press the button Export Tagged Values, or run the macro (Alt-F8) exportTaggedValuesFromEA in order to get all tagged values into the sheet.
  • After modifying the content of the tagged values press the button Import Tagged Values, or run the macro (Alt-F8) importTaggedValuesFromExcel and press start to start import.
    TaggedValuesDialog

 

Customizing

The code of this little tool is embedded as VBA in the document, and as such can be edited by anyone with basic programming skills.

To open the code editor press Alt-F11.

There are three major parts for the code

  • ExcelImporter
    The module that contains the importFromExcel macro. This is where you want to make changes.
  • EAConnector
    A facade for EA’s API containing all kinds of useful functions. You probably don’t need to change anything here.
  • ExcelConnector
    A facade for Excel with the code to get the values of the sheet. Again probably no need to change anything here.

Both the Excel file as the VBA code embedded in it is free for use. Just be kind and leave the reference to my name in the code if you use it.

Article originally published on Bellekens.com

Published in Community Resources